Steel Use In The World Cup Stadiums

If you’re a football (fútbol) fan, you know it’s not just a game – it’s a way of life. This summer, the 2014 FIFA World Cup has literately taken Brazil by storm.  Spread across from coast to coast and the heart of Brazil, thirty two countries were unified under one roof.

“The FIFA World Cup being held in such a multi-cultural society is bound to bring people together. There are no differences in football; social classes don’t exist.” 

FIFA President Joseph S. Blatter quotes that such an event will only bring people together from around the world.  Brazil 2014 will involve thirty two teams and twelve host cities across the five regions of Brazil, featuring modern stadiums which have been built or renovated for the tournament.  They represent the jewel in the crown of the respective cities.

Whether  it is the main structure or supporting roofing and facades, steel was  the material of choice for all newly build or renovated venues due to its strength, versatility and aesthetical advantages.

– Nossa Que Aço! – Thats Our Steel! –

Arena Amazônia, Manaus: Considered the structural impact – the Amazônia Arena used steel in its robust structure in the shape of a huge indigenous basket, with 72 X-shaped modules.

1566721_full-lnd

Volume of steel used: 6,800 tonnes Capacity: 39,118
Volume of steel used: 6,800 tonnes
Capacity: 39,118

Baixada Arena, Curitiba: Considered one of Brazil’s most modern and best-appointed stadiums.  Steel contributed with the structure covering the 196-meter central span, composed of two trussed beams, with 10 meters in height.

Volume of steel used: 4,880 tonnes Capacity: 38,533
Volume of steel used: 4,880 tonnes
Capacity: 38,533

Corinthians Arena, Sao Paulo: Known as the modern giant – the steel structure of the huge free span extends 120 meters between the East and West wings.  The cover is supported by two large-sized steel trusses, with up to 75 meters in length, weighing 12 tons each.

2063736_full-lnd

Volume of steel used: 10,000 tonnes Capacity: 61,606
Volume of steel used: 10,000 tonnes
Capacity: 61,606

Fonte Nova Arena, Salvador: Harmonized with the beauty of its surroundings, the 36,000 m²cover of the Fonte Nova Arena was executed with a light steel structure base.

Arena_Fonte_Nova_External_View

Volume of steel used: 1,198 tonnes  Steel structure of the compression ring: 586 tonnes  Steel structure of the traction ring: 9.2 km of steel cables Capacity: 51,708
Volume of steel used: 1,198 tonnes
Steel structure of the compression ring: 586 tonnes
Steel structure of the traction ring: 9.2 km of steel cables
Capacity: 51,708Pantanal Arena – FLEXIBLE CAPACITY

Pantanal Arena, Cuiabá: Especially built for Brazil 2014, the sustainable approach for its central theme of construction and maintenance was nicknamed O Verdão’ (The Big Green).  The stadium’s steel structure is coated by a perforated membrane composed of PVC (50%) and textile fiber (50%).

Arena Pantanal

Volume of steel used: 9,000 tonnes Capacity: 39,859
Volume of steel used: 9,000 tonnes
Capacity: 39,859

Pernambuco Arena, Recife:  In the cover, a surprising structure consist of special cable-stayed steel.  In the façade, a layer composed of pneumatic cushions which provided its description as the special mesh structure.

arena pernambuco2

Volume of steel used: 1,450 tonnes Capacity: 42,583
Volume of steel used: 1,450 tonnes
Capacity: 42,583

Beira Rio, Porto Alegre: The new “luxurious envelope” Beira-Rio, is aesthetically one of the most overwhelming stadiums.  It was made possible by the use of a steel structure comprising 65 steel leaf-shaped portals. The steel structure supporting each of the 65 leaves weighs 40 tons, with 38 m of height and 53 m of width.

beira-rio2

Volume of steel used: 3,300 tonnes Capacity: 60,348
Volume of steel used: 3,300 tonnes
Capacity: 60,348

Castelão Arena, Fortaleza:  With a breathtaking façade, which used 12,000 m² of stainless steel plates, and its structure of trussed portals similar to a sailboat, the Castelão Arena was the first stadium to be finished for the World Cup.

arena castelao

Volume of steel used: 3,300 tonnes Capacity: 60,348
Volume of steel used: 3,300 tonnes
Capacity: 60,348

Dunas Arena, Natal: The application of steel in the cover allowed the lightness and beauty of geometry, with an architectural project re-interpreting the wavy shapes of the dunes present in the local landscape.

dunas2

Volume of steel used: 1,366 tonnes Capacity: 38,958
Volume of steel used: 1,366 tonnes
Capacity: 38,958

Mineirão Arena, Belo Horizonte: The integrated concrete-steel solution that combines preservation and modernization of the stadium keeping its tradition and modernity.

Esto mineriao

Volume of steel used: 1,508 tonnes Capacity: 62,160
Volume of steel used: 1,508 tonnes
Capacity: 62,160

Brasília National Stadium, Brasília: The city’s Estadio Nacional has been all but demolished to make way for the stadium, which boasts a new facade, metal roof and stands, as well as a lowered pitch enabling unobstructed views from every seat.

Brasilia

Volume of steel used: 3,100 tonnes Capacity: 38,958
Volume of steel used: 3,100 tonnes
Capacity: 38,958

Maracanã Arena, Rio de Janeiro: The use of steel modernized the stadium’s structures thus making it Brazil’s biggest football ground.  The final showdown of the tournament will take place at Maracanã.

Estádio do Maracanã

Volume of steel used: 2,460 tonnes (cover) Capacity: 74,689
Volume of steel used: 2,460 tonnes (cover)
Capacity: 74,689

From the players to the fans and the overall football culture, steel brought nations together.  Steel brought people from all over the world under one roof.  For the love of the game, steel supported the stadium structures so that fans can support their country.

Learn more about steel by visiting SMC’s website, click here.

 

Written by:

Jovelle W. // SMC Editor

International Trade and Marketing Specialist

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