MoMA’s “Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980”

Today we are excited to bring you to New York into the famous Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). This famous museum has been important in developing and collecting modernist art and is often considered as one of the most influential museum of modern art in the world. You can discover various collections about architecture & design, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, etc.

The Museum of Modern Art – New York. Photo from blog.artsnapper.com

Wondering what’s happening right now in MoMA? From March 29 through July 19 2015, the museum documents a dynamic period in Latin American architecture between 1955 and 1980 – Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980. In 1955, MoMA staged Latin American Architecture since 1945 and now is the 60th anniversary of that important show!

“This period of self-questioning, exploration, and complex political shifts also saw the emergence of the notion of Latin America as a landscape of development, one in which all aspects of cultural life were colored in one way or another by this new attitude to what emerged as the “Third World.” The 1955 exhibition featured the result of a single photographic campaign, but Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955–1980 brings together a wealth of original materials that have never before been brought together and, for the most part, are rarely exhibited even in their home countries.”
(Quated from MoMA)

As mentioned in a review from The New York Times, from Cuba to Chile, Mexico to Argentina, cities in the region boomed. The task of providing everybody with homes ultimately proved unmanageable: proliferating slums outpaced new construction; poverty rose. Even so, what got built through the 1970s in places like Havana and Buenos Aires, Mexico City and Lima included some of the most inspired architecture of the modern age.

The Bank of London and South America in Buenos Aires. Photo from Metropolis.
The National School of Plastic Arts in Havana. Photo from Metropolis
Lúcio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer's Plaza of the Three Powers in Brasilia
Plaza of the Three Powers in Brasilia. Photo from architectmagazine
Miguel Rodrigo Mazuré’s project for a hotel in Machu Picchu (1969). Photo from Metropolis
Rogelio Salmona. Torres del Parque Residencial Complex, Bogotá, Colombia, 1964-1970. Photograph: Leonardo Finotti © Leonardo Finotti. Click above to see larger image.
Torres del Parque Residencial Complex, Colombia. Photo from Metalocus.

The exhibition’s goal, said curator Barry Bergdoll, is to “reinsert Latin America into our history of modernism and modernization in architecture.”

The collection covers every aspect of Modernism – diagrid skycrapers, abstract landscapes, megastructures, cities of slabs and we can admire a broad range of works, including urban planning, innovations in housing (both individual and multi-unit), university design, and civic and public spaces. More than 500 original works are on display—many shown for the first time—and include drawings, models, archival films, and photographs.

Latin America in Construction
Model of Headquarters for the Banco de Londres y América del Sur, Buenos Aires (1966) by Clorinda Testa and SEPRA Arquitectos. Photo from Archidose.
Latin America in Construction
Model of Edificio Altolar, Caracas (1966) by Jimmy Alcock. Photo from Archidose.
Latin America in Construction
Project for the first city in Antarctica (1980-83) by Amancio Williams. Photo from Archidose

As one of the leading manufacturer and supplier in the production of metal products, Shanghai Metal Corporation provides first class products and services in building materials. Check out our main products such as container houses, fasteners, steel grating, roofing materials and steel building.  Feel free to contact us for any question, our English-speaking staff will be more than glad to help you. Don’t forget to follow us on social media to get the latest update of our products and offers.

Sources : The New York Times, Archdaily, Architect Magazine, MoMA, Metalocus, Architectural Record

    

Ayu P.//SMC Editor

Artificial Mineral Re-Created by Reverse Engineering Tech

How easy can you get hold of precious metals and stones in their natural form? Gold, copper, tantalum, aluminum is surely more commonly seen in varying forms of artifacts such as technological, artistic, auto parts, electric, machinery, etc. In addition to their number of applications, these metals also have great recycling properties, giving life to new devices at any time.

rock1

However, once the precious elements leave their mineral form, there is no way back to it until two artists had a great idea to create an artificial mineral from old metal parts. As part of the project “Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen” an artificial mineral was created: H / AlCuTaAu. The project was commissioned for Arbeid van de Dag, De Brakke Grond, Amsterdam.

rock2

The artwork uses precious metals and stones that previously comprised old computers, electric drills, cellphones, and other machinery components recovered from a bankrupt factory. The reverse-engineering work is a result of extensive research and “speaks of the provenance of technological artifacts and the value of labor”, says Cohen and van Balen, the artists behind the art piece. They have a really poetic way of showing the tension and entanglement between technology and nature to create artificial minerals, unnatural animals and poetic machines.

rock4

Cohen and van Balen are well known artists with art pieces such as 75 Watt acquired as a permanent collection by the Museum of Modern Art, MOMA in New York City.

rock5

Shanghai Metal Corporation offers a wide range of metals such as copper and aluminum, widely used in technological, artistic, auto, electric, machinery artifacts. To find out more, please visit our Website, WordPress, LinkedIn , Twitter , Facebook  and Instagram. Or you could try our new mobile app by scanning our QR code. Moreover, we sell directly from Alibaba , EC21 ,Tradekey or directly at sales@shanghaimetal.com.

SMC QR code

#BuildingValueAcrossTheGlobe

Source and pictures: cohenvanbalen.com, thecreatorsproject.vice.com, nextnature.net

Camilla G.//SMC Editor