The 2014 World’s Busiest Container Ports. The winner is…

Wondering which are the busiest container ports across the planet? And which is the world’s leading port city for 2014? This article will provide you with the answer. The list was made public a few weeks ago and, not surprisingly, eight of the top ten ports are Chinese. Moreover, according to Medi Telegraph, 14 is the number of the ports that, in 2014, have handled more than 10 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent unit), two more than 2013 (Kaohsiung and Dalian). In this chart the only non-Asian ports are Dubai and Rotterdam.

Here is the chart.

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from scarbrough-intl.com

The winner is again Shanghai.

  Port Country Volume Million TEU 2014/2013
1 Shanghai China 35.28 +5%
2 Singapore Singapore 33.90 +4.1%
3 Shenzhen China 24.03 +3.3%
4 Hong Kong China 22.30 +0.1%
5 Ningbo China 19.45 +12%
6 Busan South Korea 18.65 +5.5%
7 Qindao China 16.62 +7%
8 Guangzhou China 16.16 +6%
9 Dubai United Arab Emirates 15.24 +11.8%
10 Tianjin China 14.05 +8.1%

Following, Rotterdam 12.30 million TEUs (+ 5.8%), Port Kelang 10, 94 million TEUs (+ 5.8%), Kaohsiung 10.59 million TEUs (+ 6.5%), Dalian 10.59 million TEUs (+ 2%). The Chinese ports alone have handled a total of 179 million TEUs, 6% more than the previous year. (from themeditelegraph.com)

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‘Shanghai Port’ from chinarushonline.com

For the fifth consecutive time Shanghai is confirmed as the busiest port for containers in the world. Indeed, in 2010, Singapore lost its crown as leading world’s port remaining so far one step behind in Shanghai.

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‘The Port of Singapore’ from forbes.com

Congrats Shaghai and… guess what! Shanghai Metal Corporation based in the city with the busiest world’s container port, provides you with a great selection of containers. Visit our website for more details and do not hesitate to contact us.

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Stefano// SMC Editor

Facebook may provide the worldwide internet!

When we get lost, we check maps on our smartphone. When we want to know about the place while traveling, we check it on the internet. When we take photos, we want to share it. Where? Most likely on Facebook. And Facebook is the one who plans to extend the internet to communities worldwide.

mark
Mark Zuckerberg

 Only a third of the globe can currently access the web and Facebook sees an opportunity here. Facebook with its CEO Mark Zuckerberg is now developing solar power drones which can fly 12 miles high and are capable of boosting worldwide internet access. The social network’s founder is hoping that his project Internet.org will provide internet access to the other two-thirds.

The company has been discussing using drones, or planes as they prefer to call them. They want them to circle constantly in the sky. Planes would be about the size of a commercial aircraft. Those planes have to fly above all airspace, that is between 60,000 and 90, 000 feet where no plane flies. The planes also have  to be solar powered so they can fly continuously without refueling.

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A drone

There are some regulatory issues and problems connected to this project. There is normally one person to manage a single drone. “We can’t have one person per plane if we want to figure out how to connect the world.” says Yael Maguire, an engineering director at Facebook’s Connectivity Lab. The second issue is that the airspace above 60,000 feet is not currently regulated at all. The team aims to send at least one drone for a test flight, hopefully in 2015 in U.S. airspace.

Find out about aero industry in Shanghai Metal Corporation on our website or send us inquiry. Our English speaking staff will gladly answer all your questions. You could also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LindkedIn,  or Instagram. Download our new application by scanning QR code below.

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 Silvia M.//SMC Editor

You can read more articles by this author here.

Credit and pictures : mirror.co.uk, abcnews.go.com, inhabitat.com, googleimages

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Do You Know How The UK Coins Are Made And What Are They Made of?

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The processes involved in producing a coin can be broken down into three different sections: making the blanks, making the dies and striking the coins.

Making the blanks

Depending on the alloy required, the appropriate metals are melted in the necessary proportions in a furnace. The metal is then extracted from the furnace in the form of a continuous strip, which is cut to produce coils weighing up to 2.8 tonnes. The strip is passed through powerful rolling mills to reduce it to the thickness of a coin. Blank discs of metal are then punched from the strip in a blanking press at a rate of up to 10,000 a minute. Rolling metal under great pressure makes it hard so the blanks have to be softened, something which is achieved by heating them in an annealing furnace at up to 950°C.

Making the dies

Once a design has been approved, a plaster model is prepared at several times the diameter of the intended coin. The plaster model is scanned by a ruby-tipped probe which records the design as a digital file on a computer. Guided by this digital file, an engraving machine cuts the design into a piece of steel at the correct size of the coin. Known as a reduction punch, this piece of steel is then used to make the dies which will actually strike the coins.

Striking the coins

For the final stage of the process, the blanks are fed into a coining press containing a pair of dies. Applying a pressure of around 60 tonnes, the dies strike the blanks and turn them into coins at speeds of up to 850 a minute.

= 1 penny coin =

First Issued February 15, 1971

Diameter 20.3mm

Weight 3.56g

Thickness Bronze: 1.52mm. Copper-plated steel: 1.65mm

Composition Bronze (97pc copper, 2.5pc zinc, 0.5pc tin)

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= 2 pence coin =

First Issued February 15, 1971

Diameter 25.9mm

Weight 7.12g

Thickness Bronze: 1.85mm. Copper-plated steel: 2.03mm

Composition Bronze (97pc copper, 2.5pc zinc, 0.5pc tin)

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= 5 pence coin =

First Issued Smaller version in June 1990.

Diameter 18.0mm

Weight 3.25g

Thickness 1.7mm

Composition Cupro-nickel (75pc copper, 25pc nickel)

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= 10 pence coin =

First Issued Smaller version in September 1992.

Diameter (since 1992) 24.5mm

Weight 6.5g

Thickness 1.85mm

Composition Cupro-nickel (75pc copper, 25pc nickel)

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= 20 pence coin =

First Issued June 9, 1982

Diameter 21.4mm

Weight 5g

Thickness 1.7mm

Composition Cupro-nickel (84pc copper, 16c nickel)

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= 50 pence coin =

First Issued Smaller version introduced in September 1997. Diameter (since 1997) 27.3mm

Weight 8.0g

Thickness 1.78mm

Composition Cupro-nickel (75pc copper, 25pc nickel)

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= 1 pound coin =

Issue Date April 21, 1983

Diameter 22.5mm

Weight 9.5g

Thickness 3.15mm

Composition Nickel-Brass (70pc copper, 5.5pc nickel, 24.5pc zinc)

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= 2 pound coin =

First Issued June 15, 1998

Diameter 28.4mm

Weight 12g

Thickness 2.5mm

Composition, Outer Nickel-Brass (76pc copper, 4pc nickel, 20pc zinc). Inner Cupro-nickel (75pc copper, 25pc nickel)

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= 5 pound coin =

First Issued August 4, 1990. Previously crowns had a face value of 25p

Diameter 38.61mm

Weight 28.28g

Thickness 2.89mm

Composition Cupro-nickel (75pc copper, 25pc nickel)

Collector versions have been struck in precious metals

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As an international manufacturer and supplier for copper sheet and bronze sheet, Shanghai Metal Corporation produces slitting, edging, and oscillates winding to fit your specific copper requirements. To find out more, please visit our Website or send your inquiry here. Our English speaking personnel will be more than pleased to help you. Follow us on  LinkedInTwitter, FacebookInstagram and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. Or you could try our new mobile app by scanning our QR code.

Sources: Royal Mint, The Telegraph, museumvictoria.com.au

William P.//SMC Editor

Read more articles by this author here.

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